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PC News and Reviews

Razer Blackwidow Elite 2018 Review – Return of the Queen

October 20, 2018 — by Wccftech.com0

Razer-Blackwidow-Package-1030x773-960x720.jpg

PRODUCT INFO

Razer Blackwidow Elite Mechanical Keyboard

August 31st, 2018

Type Gaming Keyboard

Price $169.99

If Razer had just one iconic product in its entire lineup, that would have to be the Blackwidow keyboard. Throughout Razer’s long life, their signature keyboard has seen many revisions, from the keys and lighting within to expanding and dropping the number pad throughout the years. As the Razer Synapse software become more feature-rich, new functions such as Hypershift Keys and macros became a staple of the functions driving the Razer Blackwidow. Now, this year’s revision of the Razer Blackwidow Elite keyboard is well-deserving of Elite status, combining the features that gamers love with a little something new for those that enjoy some background music while they dominate the leaderboards.

Razer’s revamped switches for this year’s Blackwidow Elite keyboard offer a tactile touch that’s a bit different from what I’m accustomed to. Their Blackwidow Tournament edition from 2014 was my daily driver for such a long time, even during those awkward years when I primarily worked with an aging Alienware laptop and Samsung Chromebook to churn out my reviews. While it lacked the full 108-key array, that responsive ‘clack’ of fingers dancing across the keys became the ambient acoustics that accompanied my daily work. Fast forward a few years later and I tried out the Razer Cynosa for a brief time. Razer’s new ‘Mecha-Membrane’ for this budget-friendly Chroma keyboard was a bit too soft for my liking. Now, call me Goldielocks and the Three Boards, but I think what they did with the 2018 Razer Blackwidow Elite is just right: the Razer Green mechanical switches spring back against my fingertips with a satisfying amount of lift while offering less resistance and less mechanical noise than the other Blackwidow in my office.

razer-phone-2-chroma-dockRelated Hands on with Razer Phone 2 – Bigger, Badder, Squarer with Chroma

Continuing a trend that I’m not a personal fan of, the Razer notification lights for essential effects, such as ‘Caps Lock’ ‘Number Lock’ and ‘Hypershift’ returns as a small array of five white lights. If you weren’t already a master of knowing which light corresponded to, you could easily find yourself toggling the same key on and off just to make sure of the status. It doesn’t help that the identifying marks are simply raised icons painted in the same matte finish as the rest of the Blackwidow Elite keyboard, making it impossible to spot in less than perfect lighting. The actual Caps Lock button itself will change colors when it’s engaged, so it’s not as if you’re stuck trying to figure out which of the five tiny LEDs actually indicates that your Caps Lock is on.

Now, what Razer does absolutely right with this year’s Blackwidow Elite keyboard is the new media dial that was previously featured on their Opto-Mechanical Huntsman Elite ($199.99 at most retailers). The entire media deck is condensed down to three simple buttons (Previous, Play/Pause and Advance, each with Chroma lighting underneath) and a snazzy little media dial that’s far enough out of the way that you won’t be reaching for it accidentally. The notched grooves adorning the media dial make it easy to fine tune the optimum volume while the mute button nestled in the center has a moat of Chroma lighting preventing it too from any accidental presses. You won’t be limited to using the volume dial for whatever audio devices you have plugged into the keyboard itself and I found myself opting to use the dial to control the volume on my Razer Nommo Chroma speakers without having to reach across my desk and waste valuable time. After all, it’s all about working smarter, not harder.

razer_xbox_oneRelated Microsoft Announces X018 Event, Official Mouse and Keyboard Support for Xbox One

That media dial and trio of audio controls are for more than just music if you’re into customizing your tools of the trade. With the Razer Synapse suite, all five functions can be freely customized to your liking and I personally tweaked that media dial around to work as a rewind and fast forward function when I have to transcribe audio interviews. With the Razer Synapse 3 deck, the various functions that drive both the aesthetic and versatility of the Razer Blackwidow Elite are at hand.

Among the other bells and whistles that help justify the Razer Blackwidow Elite 2018’s higher price tag are the addition of a USB 2.0 and 3.5mm headphone jack on the left side of the keyboard (thus reducing any awkward cables sticking out the right side the might interfere with using your mouse or being bumped into when using the media dial). Also, this year’s Blackwidow Elite features a simple, no-frills handrest that magnetically bolts onto the southern edge of the keyboard. Even when furiously typing away at this review or rushing to make a 10 AM order on Limited Run Games before they sold out, neither task was enough to break that magnetic link and move the handrest out of position. The entire Blackwidow Elite board has a definite heft to it, so it certainly won’t be sliding out from under your dancing fingertips. If anything, it may be the first office tool I pick up in defense of a zombie outbreak.

Razer’s shown that sometimes, it’s best to go back to the basics when it comes to iterations. Many of the features seen in this year’s Blackwidow Elite were previously available on the Razer Huntsman Elite, but without the experimental OptoMechanical switches of the latter. Even if fiddling with Razer Chroma isn’t your jam, the Razer Blackwidow Elite still features a number of enhancements that can easily be worthy of being crowned the queen of your office space. I’ve already dethroned my old Blackwidow Tournament Edition from its four year reign and will be paying this year’s Blackwidow Elite tribute for many more months to come.

Review unit provided by the manufacturer. You can purchase the keyboard on Amazon.

[embedded content]

9

The Razer Blackwidow Elite represents the upper echelon of quality gamers can expect from Razer. Updated Razer Green switches lead to greater precision and the new media dial means comfortable listening is only a touch away.

Performance9

Value8.7

Design & Aesthetics9

Features9.3

Pros

  • Solid construction with a nice weight to keep from slipping
  • Removeable handrest that doesn’t wiggle free during the heat of battle
  • Razer Green Switches that have a nice tactile feel but won’t exceed a comfortable dB
  • New media dial keeps the audio levels close at hand
  • Gaming Mode removes those pesky Windows key presses
  • Full Chroma customization and integration

Cons

  • Hypershift/Caps Lock notifications still single white LED’s that are impossible to read in the dark
  • USB passthrough isn’t USB 3.0
  • Nearly double the price of a Corsair K68

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PC News and Reviews

NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1060 With 6 GB GDDR5X Memory and GP104 GPU Now Available – Retains 1280 CUDA Cores, Clock Speeds From Reference Variant

October 19, 2018 — by Wccftech.com0

GTX-1060-Official-740x370.jpg

It looks like NVIDIA has silently introduced a new GeForce GTX 1060 SKU in their lineup which has even better specifications than the original variant. The GeForce GTX 1060 has seen many variants since its launch back in 2016 and still receives updates as it is one of the most popular gaming card available under the $300 US price bracket.

NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1060 6 GB Graphics Card Gets GDDR5X Memory – Slight Update To Tackle AMD Radeon RX 590?

With AMD’s refresh Polaris lineup closing in for launch, NVIDIA has just gone ahead with a memory bump on their mainstream GeForce GTX 1060 graphics card. The GeForce GTX 1060 originally got 8 Gbps memory which was later updated to 9 Gbps on the 6 GB GDDR5 variants. Now, NVIDIA will be offering a 6 GB GDDR5X variant which will deliver even higher memory bandwidth to the graphics card, resulting in a small but noticeable performance improvement.

msi-geforce-rtx-2070-gaming-z_2Related NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2070 3DMark Timespy Performance Benchmark Leaks Out – Slightly Faster Than GeForce GTX 1080

One thing we have learned from Pascal overclocking is that a memory overclock would improve performance dramatically. The graphics card is a perfect fit for 1080p & 1440p gaming with a good array of graphical settings but with higher bandwidth, you’d definitely expect a small improvement in performance.

Currently, only Micron produces GDDR5X memory while the industry has is now moving to GDDR6 with the GeForce 20 series cards. Micron’s product catalog shows that they offer 10 Gb/s and up to 12 Gb/s DRAM speeds on their G5X solutions. Considering that the GeForce GTX 1060 6 GB is a mainstream card, the entry-level 10 Gbps chips would be an ideal choice. Aside from the reference speeds, GDDR5X has good overclocking potential so you can hit higher clocks with manual tuning with ease.

nasdaq-2-2Related Technology Stocks See Their Worst Day in Seven Years, AMD and NVIDIA Plummet

When it comes to specifications, the GPU specs remain the same which include 1280 CUDA Cores, 1506 MHz base clock, 1708 Boost clock and a 6 GB GDDR5X memory running along a 192-bit bus interface. That would deliver a bandwidth of 240 GB/s if the memory is clocked at 10 Gb/s. Aside from that, the TDP would remain set at 120W and would require a single 6-pin connector to feed the graphics board. The interesting thing here is that the GeForce GTX 1060 6 GB graphics card was launched with the GP106 GPU but was later available in cut down GP104 variants, retaining the same core specs. The GP106 full config offers 1280 CUDA cores while the GP104 full config offers 2560 CUDA cores.

NVIDIA GeForce 10 Pascal Family

Graphics Card Name NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1050 2 GB NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1050 3 GB NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1050 Ti NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1060 3 GB NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1060 5 GB NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1060 6 GB NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1070 NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1070 Ti NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1080 NVIDIA Titan X NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1080 Ti NVIDIA Titan Xp
Graphics Core GP107 GP107 GP107 GP106 / GP104 GP106 GP106 / GP104 GP104 GP104 GP104 GP102 GP102 GP102
Process Node 14nm FinFET 14nm FinFET 14nm FinFET 16nm FinFET 16nm FinFET 16nm FinFET 16nm FinFET 16nm FinFET 16nm FinFET 16nm FinFET 16nm FinFET 16nm FinFET
Die Size 132mm2 132mm2 132mm2 200mm2 200mm2 200mm2 314mm2 314mm2 314mm2 471mm2 471mm2 471mm2
Transistors 3.3 Billion 3.3 Billion 3.3 Billion 4.4 Billion 4.4 Billion 4.4 Billion 7.2 Billion 7.2 Billion 7.2 Billion 12 Billion 12 Billion 12 Billion
CUDA Cores 640 CUDA Cores 768 CUDA Cores 768 CUDA Cores 1152 CUDA Cores 1280 CUDA Cores 1280 CUDA Cores 1920 CUDA Cores 2432 CUDA Cores 2560 CUDA Cores 3584 CUDA Cores 3584 CUDA Cores 3840 CUDA Cores
Base Clock 1354 MHz 1392 MHz 1290 MHz 1506 MHz 1506 MHz 1506 MHz 1506 MHz 1607 MHz 1607 MHz 1417 MHz 1480 MHz 1480 MHz
Boost Clock 1455 MHz 1518 MHz 1392 MHz 1708 MHz 1708 MHz 1708 MHz 1683 MHz 1683 MHz 1733 MHz 1530 MHz 1583 MHz 1582
FP32 Compute 1.8 TFLOPs 2,3 TFLOPs 2.1 TFLOPs 4.0 TFLOPs 4.4 TFLOPs 4.4 TFLOPs 6.5 TFLOPs 8.1 TFLOPs 9.0 TFLOPs 11 TFLOPs 11.5 TFLOPs 12.5 TFLOPs
VRAM 2 GB GDDR5 3 GB GDDR5 4 GB GDDR5 3 GB GDDR5 6 GB GDDR5 6 GB GDDR5/X 8 GB GDDR5 8 GB GDDR5 8 GB GDDR5X 12 GB GDDR5X 11 GB GDDR5X 12 GB GDDR5X
Memory Speed 7 Gbps 7 Gbps 7 Gbps 8 Gbps 8 Gbps 9 Gbps / 10 Gbps 8 Gbps 8 Gbps 11 Gbps 10 Gbps 11 Gbps 11.4 Gbps
Memory Bandwidth 112 GB/s 84 GB/s 112 GB/s 192 GB/s 160 GB/s 224 GB/s / 240 GB/s 256 GB/s 256 GB/s 352 GB/s 480 GB/s 484 GB/s 547 GB/s
Bus Interface 128-bit bus 96-bit bus 128-bit bus 192-bit bus 160-bit bus 192-bit bus 256-bit bus 256-bit bus 256-bit bus 384-bit bus 352-bit bus 384-bit bus
Power Connector None None None Single 6-Pin Power Single 6-Pin Power Single 6-Pin Power Single 8-Pin Power Single 8-Pin Power Single 8-Pin Power 8+6 Pin Power 8+6 Pin Power 8+6 Pin Power
TDP 75W 75W 75W 120W 120W 120W 150W 180W 180W 250W 250W 250W
Display Outputs 1x Display Port 1.4
1x HDMI 2.0b
1x DVI
1x Display Port 1.4
1x HDMI 2.0b
1x DVI
1x Display Port 1.4
1x HDMI 2.0b
1x DVI
3x Display Port 1.4
1x HDMI 2.0b
1x DVI
3x Display Port 1.4
1x HDMI 2.0b
1x DVI
3x Display Port 1.4
1x HDMI 2.0b
1x DVI
3x Display Port 1.4
1x HDMI 2.0b
1x DVI
3x Display Port 1.4
1x HDMI 2.0b
1x DVI
3x Display Port 1.4
1x HDMI 2.0b
1x DVI
3x Display Port 1.4
1x HDMI 2.0b
1x DVI
3x Display Port 1.4
1x HDMI 2.0b
3x Display Port 1.4
1x HDMI 2.0b
Launch Date October 2016 May 2018 October 2016 September 2016 August 2018 July 2016 June 2016 October 2017 May 2016 August 2016 March 2017 April 2017
Launch Price $109 US $119 US-$129 US $139 US $199 US TBD $249 US $349 US $449 US $499 US $1200 US $699 US $1200 US

It’s an interesting choice and would be all NVIDIA want to tackle AMD’s refreshed Radeon RX 590 graphics card with the 12nm Polaris GPUs. This doesn’t go without us asking, when would we see the GeForce GTX 1060 replacement on the Turing GPU architecture? Let us know your own thoughts about the GDDR5X equipped GTX 1060 in the comments below.

Do you think the GeForce GTX 1060 6 GB With GDDR5X will be able to deliver good competition against AMD’s Polaris Refresh?

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PC News and Reviews

Intel Core i9-9900K 8 Core and 16 Thread 5.0 GHz CPU Review Ft. Z390 AORUS Master Motherboard

October 19, 2018 — by Wccftech.com0

Intel-9th-Gen-Core-Coffee-Lake-Z390-CPUs_8-1030x579-960x540.png

PRODUCT INFO

AORUS Z390 Master

October, 2018

Type Motherboard

Price $289.99 US

Introduction

Intel has come a long way with their mainstream processor platform. The platform has largely seen stagnation in terms of core and thread count over many generations since the first Core series CPU that launched back in 2010 but last year brought a big change to the CPU giant. What seemed to be a generational core clock bump has now turned into a generational core count bump while keeping the clock speed improvements.

The Coffee Lake-S 8th Generation family, was the first big core count jump on the mainstream 300 series platform. It was an opportunity for Intel to show that they don’t only hold the IPC or clock speed advantage on the mainstream segment but they can also offer good multi-threading CPU performance. While the jump to 6 cores and 12 threads was great, the competition was offering up to 8 cores and 16 threads on their mainstream platform.

dsc_0192-custom-3Related Intel Core i9-9900K 8 Core and 16 Thread 5.0 GHz CPU Review Ft. ASRock Z390 Taichi Ultimate Motherboard

Intel is now unleashing their own 8 core parts with their new 9th Generation lineup, also known as the Coffee Lake Refresh. The interesting part is that while there is the famous Core i7 SKU with 8 cores, they are also launching their first mainstream Core i9 part with 8 cores. Both parts are very interesting in their own right and the price to performance difference is something which gamers have been looking forward to, especially when Intel is terming the Core i9 SKU as the best gaming processor on the planet, which is something I’d extensively be looking into in the performance benchmarks.

aorus-z390Related Gigabyte & AORUS Launch The Next Generation Z390 Motherboard Lineup – Full Roundup Including The AORUS Xtreme and AORUS Master Heavy Weights

Today, I will be taking a look at the Core i9-9900K flagship CPU on the AORUS Z390 Master board. The CPU retails for $488 US in the market and is supposed to offer high-end CPU multi-threaded performance with enthusiast level overclocking capabilities, all at a premium price point. The Z390 AORUS Master retails for $289.99 US which is a great price for a high-end motherboard design like it.

Since the launch of Coffee Lake processors, Intel is also offering a new platform that is marked under the 300-series family. The Intel 300 series platform features several chipset SKUs but the top of the line is the Z390 PCH which replaces the Z370 PCH as the flagship mainstream SKU.

The Z390 platform is designed to support both 8th and 9th Generation Coffee Lake CPUs. Since the new processors are part of a refresh, Intel did not restrict 9th Gen compatibility to just Z390 boards or 8th Gen compatibility to just Z370 boards. We have more details on this in the LGA 1151 socket section so here, we will be taking a look at the Z390 feature set and what it offers over the previous 200 and 100 series platforms.

Intel Z390 PCH Features:

The 9th gen desktop platform has a range of new features that mainly include:

  • First performance Intel Core i9 desktop S-series processor
  • Up to 8 cores
  • Intel Z390 chipset compatible
  • Solder Thermal Interface Material (STIM)
  • Intel Wireless-AC 802.11 AC and Bluetooth 5.0
  • Intel Wireless-AC Adapter
  • Up To 6 x USB 3.1 Gen 2 Ports
  • Up to 16 threads, 5.0 GHz, 16 MB cache, and 40 platform PCIe lanes (16 CPU + 24 PCH)
  • 9th Gen CPUs Compatible with all Intel 300 series chipsets
  • Intel Optane memory and Intel Optane SSD support
  • Thunderbolt 3 support

Expected Intel 300-Series Kaby Lake Refresh and Cannon Lake PCH Features:

Chipset Name Coffee Lake S (KBL-R) PCH / Z370 Platform Coffee Lake S (CNL-H) PCH / 300 Series (Z390/H370, B360, Q370, H310)
Process Node 22nm 14nm
Processor 8C, 6C, 4C (6 Consumer SKUs at Launch)
Enhanced IA and Memory Overclocking
Gen 9 Intel Graphics GT2 (Up To 24 EUs)
Consumer Only
8C, 6C, 4C, 2C (Full corporate/consumer SKU stack at launch)
Enhanced IA and Memory Overclocking
Gen 9 Intel Graphics GT2 (Up To 24 EUs)
Corporate/vPro & Consumer
Memory Up To DDR4-2666 (Native) Up To DDR4-2666 (Native)
Media, Display & Audio DP 1.2 & HDMI 1.4
HDCP 2.2 (HDMI 2.0a w/LSPCON)
HEVC & VP9 10-bit Enc/Dec, HDR, Rec.2020, DX12
Integrated Dual-Core Audio DSP
DP 1.2 & HDMI 1.4
HDCP 2.2 (HDMI 2.0a w/LSPCON)
HEVC & VP9 10-bit Enc/Dec, HDR, Rec.2020, DX12
Integrated Dual-Core Audio DSP
SoundWire Digital Audio Interface
I/O & Connectivity Integrated USB 3.1 Gen 1 (5 Gbps)
Thunderbolt 3.0 (Alpine Ridge)
Integrated USB 3.1 Gen 1 (5 Gbps)
Integrated Intel Wireless-AC (Wi-Fi / BT CNVi)
Integrated SDXC 3.0 Controller
Thunderbolt 3.0 (Titan Ridge) w/ DP 1.4
Storage Next Gen Intel Optane memory
PCIe 3.0, SATA 3.0
Next Gen Intel Optane memory
PCIe 3.0, SATA 3.0
Security Intel SGX 1.0 Intel SGX 1.0
Power Management C8 Support C10 & S0ix Support for Modern Standby
Launch 2017 2018

Intel isn’t moving away from the LGA 1151 socket anytime soon. We are once again looking at the same socket which has been doing the rounds in the mainstream market since 2015. There is, however, a major difference. There’s no backward compatibility with Skylake and Kaby Lake processors.

That brings us to the next significant detail about the Intel 300-series platform. Intel is confirming that the 9th Gen Coffee Lake processors retain compatibility with the 300-series chipset. It’s nice to see compatibility retained but it was also expected since 9th Gen is a refresh of Coffee Lake CPUs and high-end motherboards based on the Z370 chipset still allow for full overclocking support on the 8 core processors, even though the Z390 series is tailored around those CPUs with better PWM supplies.

A more detailed analysis was posted by David Schor a few days ago which confirms the change in pin configuration on Coffee Lake processors. This allows support for both 8th and 9th Gen CPUs without any major issues.

According to David, the reason we don’t have Coffee Lake processors compatible with older series motherboards that feature the LGA 1151 socket is the change in pins. For instance, if the pin config changes on a processor, the sockets on the motherboard need to be configured as such. It’s not a process that can be done via software as its more of a hardware level change.

When compared, the Coffee Lake processors have 391 VSS (Ground) pins which is an increase of 14 compared to Kaby Lake, 146 VCC (Electrical) pins which is an increase of 18 pins compared to Kaby Lake and about 25 pins that are reserved and a decrease of 21 pins from the 46 reserved on Kaby Lake.

Kaby Lake -> Coffee Lake

  • VSS (Ground): 377 -> 391 (+14)
  • VCC (Power): 128 -> 146 (+18)
  • RSVD: 46 ->25

Intel LGA 1151 CPU Pin Configuration (Coffee Lake vs Kaby Lake):

So one thing is clear, Intel was, in fact, telling the truth about electrical changes to the processors and socket in the 300-series platform. Furthermore, it’s not just the reserved pins from Kaby Lake that have simply been populated. There are pins aside the reserved ones that were swapped with VCC pins and indicate a design tweak.

While we can put many theories to rest with this new detail, I think much of the confusion could have just been avoided if Intel clarified this themselves. Of course, if you are making the boards with a new PCH and new series of processors on the same socket that ran the previous CPU line, consumers would definitely want to know more about why the new platform that has the same socket cannot support their older chips. We previously heard about the LGA 1151 V2 naming scheme and that may have sorted some confusion but as we can tell, all motherboards still use the LGA 1151 naming scheme which may lead to people thinking that their 6th and 7th generation processors can run on the newer boards.

Cooler Compatibility With LGA 1151 Socket

Keeping the same socket has some advantages in the form of cooler compatibility. All users who are running the LGA 1151 socket or even LGA 1150 boards can use the same cooler on the Z390 boards without any hassle. The socket has the same dimensions and no changes are made aside from electrical changes that are specific to socket and processor pins. The socket assembly and mounting remain the same.

Intel does offer a separate boxed cooler but it will be a much better choice to get an AIB cooling solution since those offer better cooling performance. It is recommended for the unlocked SKUs that users run them on a high-end air cooler or liquid cooling solution. Custom loop cooling will deliver even better results.

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Intel Core i9-9900K 8 Core and 16 Thread 5.0 GHz CPU Review Ft. ASRock Z390 Taichi Ultimate Motherboard

October 19, 2018 — by Wccftech.com0

Intel-9th-Gen-Core-Coffee-Lake-Z390-CPUs_8-1030x579-1-960x540.png

PRODUCT INFO

ASRock Z390 Taichi Ultimate

October, 2018

Type Motherboard

Price $299.99 US

Introduction

Intel has come a long way with their mainstream processor platform. The platform has largely seen stagnation in terms of core and thread count over many generations since the first Core series CPU that launched back in 2010 but last year brought a big change to the CPU giant. What seemed to be a generational core clock bump has now turned into a generational core count bump while keeping the clock speed improvements.

The Coffee Lake-S 8th Generation family, was the first big core count jump on the mainstream 300 series platform. It was an opportunity for Intel to show that they don’t only hold the IPC or clock speed advantage on the mainstream segment but they can also offer good multi-threading CPU performance. While the jump to 6 cores and 12 threads was great, the competition was offering up to 8 cores and 16 threads on their mainstream platform.

dsc_0270-custom-2Related Intel Core i9-9900K 8 Core and 16 Thread 5.0 GHz CPU Review Ft. Z390 AORUS Master Motherboard

Intel is now unleashing their own 8 core parts with their new 9th Generation lineup, also known as the Coffee Lake Refresh. The interesting part is that while there is the famous Core i7 SKU with 8 cores, they are also launching their first mainstream Core i9 part with 8 cores. Both parts are very interesting in their own right and the price to performance difference is something which gamers have been looking forward to, especially when Intel is terming the Core i9 SKU as the best gaming processor on the planet, which is something I’d extensively be looking into in the performance benchmarks.

20181005-3Related ASRock Unveils An Army of Next-Generation Z390 Motherboards For Intel 9th Gen CPUs – Z390 Taichi Ultimate and Z390 Phantom Gaming 9 Take Center Stage As The Flagships

Today, I will be taking a look at the Core i9-9900K flagship CPU on the ASRock Z390 Taich Ultimate. The CPU retails for $488 US in the market and is supposed to offer high-end CPU multi-threaded performance with enthusiast level overclocking capabilities, all at a premium price point. The Z390 Taichi Ultimate retails for $299.99 US and is considered a premium offering in this price range.

Since the launch of Coffee Lake processors, Intel is also offering a new platform that is marked under the 300-series family. The Intel 300 series platform features several chipset SKUs but the top of the line is the Z390 PCH which replaces the Z370 PCH as the flagship mainstream SKU.

The Z390 platform is designed to support both 8th and 9th Generation Coffee Lake CPUs. Since the new processors are part of a refresh, Intel did not restrict 9th Gen compatibility to just Z390 boards or 8th Gen compatibility to just Z370 boards. We have more details on this in the LGA 1151 socket section so here, we will be taking a look at the Z390 feature set and what it offers over the previous 200 and 100 series platforms.

Intel Z390 PCH Features:

The 9th gen desktop platform has a range of new features that mainly include:

  • First performance Intel Core i9 desktop S-series processor
  • Up to 8 cores
  • Intel Z390 chipset compatible
  • Solder Thermal Interface Material (STIM)
  • Intel Wireless-AC 802.11 AC and Bluetooth 5.0
  • Intel Wireless-AC Adapter
  • Up To 6 x USB 3.1 Gen 2 Ports
  • Up to 16 threads, 5.0 GHz, 16 MB cache, and 40 platform PCIe lanes (16 CPU + 24 PCH)
  • 9th Gen CPUs Compatible with all Intel 300 series chipsets
  • Intel Optane memory and Intel Optane SSD support
  • Thunderbolt 3 support

Expected Intel 300-Series Kaby Lake Refresh and Cannon Lake PCH Features:

Chipset Name Coffee Lake S (KBL-R) PCH / Z370 Platform Coffee Lake S (CNL-H) PCH / 300 Series (Z390/H370, B360, Q370, H310)
Process Node 22nm 14nm
Processor 8C, 6C, 4C (6 Consumer SKUs at Launch)
Enhanced IA and Memory Overclocking
Gen 9 Intel Graphics GT2 (Up To 24 EUs)
Consumer Only
8C, 6C, 4C, 2C (Full corporate/consumer SKU stack at launch)
Enhanced IA and Memory Overclocking
Gen 9 Intel Graphics GT2 (Up To 24 EUs)
Corporate/vPro & Consumer
Memory Up To DDR4-2666 (Native) Up To DDR4-2666 (Native)
Media, Display & Audio DP 1.2 & HDMI 1.4
HDCP 2.2 (HDMI 2.0a w/LSPCON)
HEVC & VP9 10-bit Enc/Dec, HDR, Rec.2020, DX12
Integrated Dual-Core Audio DSP
DP 1.2 & HDMI 1.4
HDCP 2.2 (HDMI 2.0a w/LSPCON)
HEVC & VP9 10-bit Enc/Dec, HDR, Rec.2020, DX12
Integrated Dual-Core Audio DSP
SoundWire Digital Audio Interface
I/O & Connectivity Integrated USB 3.1 Gen 1 (5 Gbps)
Thunderbolt 3.0 (Alpine Ridge)
Integrated USB 3.1 Gen 1 (5 Gbps)
Integrated Intel Wireless-AC (Wi-Fi / BT CNVi)
Integrated SDXC 3.0 Controller
Thunderbolt 3.0 (Titan Ridge) w/ DP 1.4
Storage Next Gen Intel Optane memory
PCIe 3.0, SATA 3.0
Next Gen Intel Optane memory
PCIe 3.0, SATA 3.0
Security Intel SGX 1.0 Intel SGX 1.0
Power Management C8 Support C10 & S0ix Support for Modern Standby
Launch 2017 2018

Intel isn’t moving away from the LGA 1151 socket anytime soon. We are once again looking at the same socket which has been doing the rounds in the mainstream market since 2015. There is, however, a major difference. There’s no backward compatibility with Skylake and Kaby Lake processors.

That brings us to the next significant detail about the Intel 300-series platform. Intel is confirming that the 9th Gen Coffee Lake processors retain compatibility with the 300-series chipset. It’s nice to see compatibility retained but it was also expected since 9th Gen is a refresh of Coffee Lake CPUs and high-end motherboards based on the Z370 chipset still allow for full overclocking support on the 8 core processors, even though the Z390 series is tailored around those CPUs with better PWM supplies.

A more detailed analysis was posted by David Schor a few days ago which confirms the change in pin configuration on Coffee Lake processors. This allows support for both 8th and 9th Gen CPUs without any major issues.

According to David, the reason we don’t have Coffee Lake processors compatible with older series motherboards that feature the LGA 1151 socket is the change in pins. For instance, if the pin config changes on a processor, the sockets on the motherboard need to be configured as such. It’s not a process that can be done via software as its more of a hardware level change.

When compared, the Coffee Lake processors have 391 VSS (Ground) pins which is an increase of 14 compared to Kaby Lake, 146 VCC (Electrical) pins which is an increase of 18 pins compared to Kaby Lake and about 25 pins that are reserved and a decrease of 21 pins from the 46 reserved on Kaby Lake.

Kaby Lake -> Coffee Lake

  • VSS (Ground): 377 -> 391 (+14)
  • VCC (Power): 128 -> 146 (+18)
  • RSVD: 46 ->25

Intel LGA 1151 CPU Pin Configuration (Coffee Lake vs Kaby Lake):

So one thing is clear, Intel was, in fact, telling the truth about electrical changes to the processors and socket in the 300-series platform. Furthermore, it’s not just the reserved pins from Kaby Lake that have simply been populated. There are pins aside the reserved ones that were swapped with VCC pins and indicate a design tweak.

While we can put many theories to rest with this new detail, I think much of the confusion could have just been avoided if Intel clarified this themselves. Of course, if you are making the boards with a new PCH and new series of processors on the same socket that ran the previous CPU line, consumers would definitely want to know more about why the new platform that has the same socket cannot support their older chips. We previously heard about the LGA 1151 V2 naming scheme and that may have sorted some confusion but as we can tell, all motherboards still use the LGA 1151 naming scheme which may lead to people thinking that their 6th and 7th generation processors can run on the newer boards.

Cooler Compatibility With LGA 1151 Socket

Keeping the same socket has some advantages in the form of cooler compatibility. All users who are running the LGA 1151 socket or even LGA 1150 boards can use the same cooler on the Z390 boards without any hassle. The socket has the same dimensions and no changes are made aside from electrical changes that are specific to socket and processor pins. The socket assembly and mounting remain the same.

Intel does offer a separate boxed cooler but it will be a much better choice to get an AIB cooling solution since those offer better cooling performance. It is recommended for the unlocked SKUs that users run them on a high-end air cooler or liquid cooling solution. Custom loop cooling will deliver even better results.

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PC News and Reviews

ASUS Readies Radeon RX 590 ROG STRIX Gaming Graphics Card – 12nm Polaris Refresh With 8 Gbps Memory Launching Soon

October 19, 2018 — by Wccftech.com0

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It seems like more rumors and details of AMD upcoming Radeon RX 590 graphics cards are coming in. This time, Videocardz has confirmed that ASUS is working on a custom variant of AMD’s upcoming Polaris Refresh GPU based graphics cards, using their ROG STRIX Gaming design scheme.

ASUS Readies Radeon RX 590 ROG STRIX Gaming Graphics Cards – To Feature Polaris Refresh GPU With 8 Gbps Memory

The rumors of a third Polaris GPU lineup have been floating for a while now. It was rumored that AMD was working on a Polaris Refresh GPU, known as Polaris 30, which would utilize the new 12nm process node to deliver enhanced efficiency and faster clock speeds. It was stated that the graphics cards would arrive sometime in Q4 2018 but we didn’t get any more details aside from the fact that it would be aimed at the mainstream gaming market.

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Now recently, more details have started to pop up with which have revealed the specifications and some minor details of the graphics card. In a previous leak which showed a 3DMark listing, the AMD Radeon RX 590 graphics card features a clock speed of 1545 MHz, 8 GB GDDR5 VRAM clocked at 2000 MHz or 8 Gbps and a slight performance advantage over the Radeon RX 580 at the same clocks.

A listing of the AMD Radeon RX 590 graphics card, compared to the Radeon RX 580 which is overclocked to the same clock speeds as the upcoming Polaris refresh graphics card. (Image Credits: Tum Apisak)

Now it’s not known whether the chip will feature the same core count as the Polaris 20 based Radeon RX 580 which comes with 2304 stream processors or a different GPU config. We know that the RX 580 and RX 480 have utilized the full Polaris configuration so the refresh should also feature the same core count, with some minor architectural and process improvements that would result in higher performance at a lower power draw.

The latest leak from Videocardz reveals that ASUS is already working on their Radeon RX 590 ROG STRIX Gaming graphics card. The graphics card is labeled as ROG-STRIX-RX590-8G-GAMING and drops the AREZ brand, moving back to ROG STRIX.

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ASUS had previously designed the AREZ STRIX lineup exclusively for the Radeon RX 500 series cards after the NVIDIA GPP controversy but looks like they will no longer be using this brand anymore. If the cards are really being prepared right now, we would be looking at more details in the coming weeks for sure.

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Gaming News

Should You Get Your Kid the Nintendo Labo Vehicle Kit? 

October 17, 2018 — by Kotaku.com0

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Photo: Nintendo

I’m not exactly the most tech-savvy parent, so when I was offered a Nintendo Labo Vehicle Kit to check out, I was at first like, “Wait, what’s a Labo?”

Luckily, my son, Ryan, who had just received a much-coveted Nintendo Switch for his 8th birthday, was like, “It’s where you build really cool stuff and then you can play it on TV!”

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(I still didn’t get it, but he was excited, so I was game to try it out.)

Labo kits come with a cartridge, a small bag of assorted materials and a stack of cardboard sheets with pre-cut pieces that are popped out, folded and constructed into objects with the help of easy-to-follow, on-screen instructions.

Color-coded cardboard makes it easier to sort each project. Photo: Meghan Moravcik Walbert

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Once constructed, the two “Joy-Cons” on the Switch’s controller slide into the objects so that when you move them—to push the pedal down with your foot, for example—the game registers the movement of the Joy-Con and knows you’re hitting the gas.

With the vehicle kit, we were able to build a pedal, a car steering wheel, a submarine control panel, an airplane joystick and a spray can to customize all of our vehicles. Ryan needed a little help and supervision on the more complicated parts of the construction, but overall, he was able to do most of it himself (while I helpfully fast-forwarded through directions by holding “A” on the controller, which was not too complicated for me to manage).

After making the pedal, which is used for all the vehicles, we decided to construct the main items—a car, a submarine and an airplane—in reverse order. In hindsight, I can see why it’s suggested to make the car first; the car’s games are the most fun and most involved. But it’s also the most complicated to build. We wanted to start off easy and get to playing, so we first built the airplane, which only took us about 45 minutes (compared to the car, which took about two hours).

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The building process itself was strangely satisfying. It was reminiscent of constructing a Lego set, if Legos were much larger and made of cardboard and played a catchy tune in the background while you worked.

Here’s what I liked about Labo

The family-togetherness aspect

It was such a fun activity for us to do together. The on-screen directions even suggested now and then that we stop to take a break or have a snack, and we decided that was excellent advice and a good excuse to share some graham crackers. Ryan said this aloud to himself at one point: “This is so fun! I’m building stuff with my mom!” (That is a direct quote. He’s a sentimental kid.)

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It’s perfect for a rainy day

Or, better yet, a snow day. It’s the sort of thing I’d love to buy and stash away for a day when you need a good compromise between what your kids want (to be on screens all day) and what you want (for them to use their brains in some way).

Kids can see, firsthand, how a machine works

Particularly with the car, which has a wheel and lever-system, it’s really cool for kids to see the inner workings as it comes together. We talked about how when we use machines (like phones or computers), we press buttons and things happen on the inside but we never get to see what it looks like or how it works. With Labo, we can see exactly how things are pulling and moving on the inside before it’s all closed off forever.

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The inner workings of the Nintendo Labo car steering wheel.Photo: Meghan Moravcik Walbert

The customization

At the end, we put together a little “spray can” that you can use to paint your vehicles with different colors and patterns. Ryan said this was his favorite part of the whole process because, and I quote, “I got to fancy up my car.”

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(As an aside: They even instruct you to put little round pieces inside the can that rattle when you shake it so it actually SOUNDS like a real spray can. I’ve decided that whoever designed these kits has the coolest job on the planet.)

The cardboard really is sturdy

If you’re anything like me, you’re thinking, “a cardboard pedal will last exactly 30 seconds with my child.” It’s thicker and sturdier than you’d think, though, and we expect it to hold up pretty well.

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You can use the car with the Mario Kart 8 Deluxe game

This is a bonus for me because Mario Kart is my favorite Nintendo game, but I’m not exactly the best driver. The steering wheel is going to take my game to the next level. (The Nintendo was for Ryan, I promise.)

What I Didn’t Love About Labo

Only one thing: Once constructed, the pieces are really big. I’m not sure where to store all of this now. I found a vehicle storage case on Amazon, but it’s $80, so that’s not happening. So, for now, some pieces are stashed away in a large end table and some are sitting on different surfaces in my dining room.

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Ultimately, we do have plans to create a little “kid cave” area in the basement for Ryan, and the Switch and all its accessories will go down there, so it’s not a huge deal. But you might want to think through what you’ve got space for before you start buying all the kits. (There are all kinds of stuff you can make with different kits, including a guitar, a piano, robots, a fishing pole and an arcade console.)

That said, the good certainly outweighed the temporary clutter. And I’m feeling slightly more tech-savvy than I did before this whole thing started.

PC News and Reviews

World’s First NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2070 Review Leaks Out Before NDA

October 15, 2018 — by Wccftech.com0

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Kyle Bennett of HardOCP has done it again. In what is undoubtedly the world’s first legit review of the NVIDIA RTX 2070 a few days before the official NDA lift, the website has already published its comprehensive review. I decided not to put any spoilers in the heading but long story short the RTX 2070 is slightly faster than the GTX 1080 – which is perfectly in line with a good generational performance bump.

HardOCP Breaks The World’s First NVIDIA RTX 2070 Review and Benchmarks: MSI’s RTX 2070 Gaming Z Featured

All images and benchmarks in this post are courtesy of HardOCP and if you want to read the full review be sure to head over to there site by clicking the link above.

The RTX 2070 is one of the more elusive graphics cards of this generation and one of the more sought after entrants. It is positioned to provide the standard (and impressive) generational performance advantage we have come to expect of NVIDIA graphics cards as well as a taste of the brand new Turing tech (such as RTX and DLSS). The question that is on everyone’s mind, of course, is just how fast it will be. Well, depending on the clocks of the card and your luck in the silicon lottery you can easily expect the card to outperform 1080 of similar caliber with highly overclocked variants even nearing the GTX 1080 Ti performance range.

I took the liberty of showing a few benchmarks from the full review and as you can see, the RTX 2070 is in a very comfortable lead over the GTX 1080. Not only that but the minimum fps count is better as well. The only problem right now is, of course, the RTX 2070 is quite expensive as compared to a GTX 1080. The reason is price gouging and the fact that the RTX lineup is generally more impressive. All that said, that RTX 2070 is very easily a 1440p card if you are someone who wants to play out at maxed settings.

If you are someone who feels just fine playing at high or even medium-high settings than you can easily push 4k or 4k 60+ respectively. Needless to say, this is a great card, the only question that needs to be asked is whether you can get this for a great price as well.

As far as clocks go, while the card is rated at a boost clock of 1710 MHz for the FE, depending on the silicon quality the dynamic boost feature of Turing cards should easily keep you above the 1900 MHz mark. The particular variant that Kyle had was able to sustain a minimum boost of 1920 MHz which is pretty great and I am sure good silicon can cross the 2.0 GHz mark with just a little bit of OC (this particular variant touched 1965 MHz).

Image courtesy of HardOCP.

The MSI RTX 2070 Gaming Z also has great RGB and silent fan operation – the standard bells and whistles of cards nowadays and just 2 propeller fans. Be sure to read out the full review at:

Click this link to read the full review of the GeForce MSI RTX 2070 Gaming Z over at HardOCP

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PC News and Reviews

Intel Core i5-9600K 6 Core/6 Thread CPU Overclocking Performance Benchmarks Leak Out – Achieves 5.2 GHz on High-End Air Cooler

October 14, 2018 — by Wccftech.com0

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The latest performance benchmarks of Intel’s Core i5-9600K mainstream unlocked processor have leaked out. The benchmarks were posted over at a Chinese video streaming portal and show both, the stock and overclocked performance of the soon to be released chip in various CPU intensive workloads.

Intel Core i5-9600K 6 Core CPU Tested At Both Stock and Overclocked Configurations – Achieves 5.2 GHz on Air Cooling

The performance benchmarks posted are from CPU-specific workloads and not game benchmarks which most people are looking forward to seeing. Still, the results give us a good idea of what is to be expected from the new 9th Gen Core i5 processors. We know that Intel has already announced their 9th Generation Core lineup which would be available on 19th October.

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The Intel Core i5-9600K is a 6 core and 6 thread part with 9 MB of L3 cache. This makes it very similar to the Core i5-8600K. The difference is that it features higher clock speeds of 3.7 GHz base, 4.6 GHz boost (1 core), 4.5 GHz (2 core), 4.4 GHz (4 core) and 4.3 GHz (6 core). All of this is done at the same TDP of 95W. The processor will retail at a price of $262 US when it’s available next week.

As for the performance testing, the chip was tested on the MSI Z390 MEG Godlike motherboard with 16 GB of DDR4 memory and a high-end Thermalright Silver Arrow Extreme air cooler. The processor was first tested at stock clocks and showed that it was able to maintain a frequency of 4.60 GHz in single and around 4.3 GHz across all cores when running multi-thread intensive workloads. It should be noted that the chip has 6 lower threads compared to the Core i7-8700K and a 100 MHz lower boost clock. It still managed to deliver some really good numbers.

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Coming to the overclocked performance benchmarks, we see that the chip was overclocked to 5.2 GHz on air cooling with a voltage of 1.507V which is quite high. It’s not known whether this was a manual overclock or an auto overclock using the built-in BIOS tuner. The Core i5-9600K uses the new STIM (Soldered Thermal Interface Material) and even still, the temperatures were going past 90C (Degrees) at full load across all cores. The culprit probably being the high voltage. The entire system power consumption was 240W in the CPU only workloads which are standard for all CPUs in the mainstream department.

Following are a few performance differences at stock and overclocked configurations:

Cinebench R15

  • Core i5-9600K @ Stock: 1034 CB
  • Core i5-9600K @ 5.2G: 1207 CB

CPU-Z

  • Core i5-9600K @ Stock: 528.8 Single Thread / 2919.1 Multi-Thread
  • Core i5-9600K @ 5.2G: 619 Single Thread / 3579.7 Multi-Thread

X264 HD Benchmark

  • Core i5-9600K @ Stock: 37.55 fps
  • Core i5-9600K @ 5.2G: 43.76 fps

Intel 9th Generation Core Family CPU Official Specifications:

Processor Name Process Cores / Threads Base Clock Boost Clock Cache TDP Price
Core i9-9900K 14nm++ 8 / 16 3.6 GHz 5.0 GHz (1/2 Core)
4.8 GHz (4 Core)
4.7 GHz (6/8 Core)
16 MB 95W $488 US
Core i7-9700K 14nm++ 8 / 8 3.6 GHz 4.9 GHz (1 Core)
4.8 GHz (2 Core)
4.7 GHz (4 Core)
4.6 GHz (6/8 Core)
12 MB 95W $374 US
Core i5-9600K 14nm++ 6 / 6 3.7 GHz 4.6 GHz (1 Core)
4.5 GHz (2 Core)
4.4 GHz (4 Core)
4.3 GHz (6 Core)
9 MB 95W $262 US
Core i5-9600 14nm++ 6 / 6 3.1 GHz 4.5 GHz 9 MB 65W TBD
Core i5-9500 14nm++ 6 / 6 3.0 GHz 4.3 GHz 9 MB 65W TBD
Core i5-9400 14nm++ 6 / 6 2.9 GHz 4.1 GHz 9 MB 65W TBD
Core i5-9400T 14nm++ 6 / 6 1.8 GHz 3.4 GHz 9 MB 35W TBD
Core i3-9100 14nm++ 4 / 4 3.7 GHz N/A 6 MB 65W TBD
Core i3-9000 14nm++ 4 / 4 3.7 GHz N/A 6 MB 65W TBD
Core i3-9000T 14nm++ 4 / 4 3.2 GHz N/A 6 MB 35W TBD

You can check out our full Z390 motherboard roundup, including ASRock MSI, ASUS, AORUS, EVGA products here. As for the launch details, you can read more on that here.

Which Intel 9th Generation CPUs are you most interested in?

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PC News and Reviews

EA to Remaster Command & Conquer Series and Bring It Back To PC

October 12, 2018 — by ThinkComputers.org0

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It looks as if EA will be remastering at least a few of the original Command & Conquer games very soon. This was revealed by Jim Vessella, Producer at Electronic Arts.

Vassella said: “As most of you may know, we recently announced Command & Conquer: Rivals, a mobile game set in the Command & Conquer universe. Following the reveal of Rivals, we heard you loud and clear: the Command & Conquer community also wants to see the franchise return to PC. And as a fan of C&C for over 20 years, I couldn’t agree more. With that in mind we’ve been exploring some exciting ideas regarding remastering the classic PC games, and already have the ball rolling on our first effort to celebrate the upcoming 25th Year Anniversary.”

It will definitely be cool to see a remaster of any of the games in the Command & Conquer series, but we all should agree that the franchise needs to return to PC. Command & Conquer was one of the first RTS games I played and having a new AAA Command & Conquer game would be awesome!

Vassella said that over the next few weeks they will be talking to fans in a variety of ways, saying that they are eager to hear fans’ feedback to help influence their current thoughts for PC and what comes next.

Source:DSO Gaming

PC News and Reviews

NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2070 3DMark Timespy Performance Benchmark Leaks Out – Slightly Faster Than GeForce GTX 1080

October 12, 2018 — by Wccftech.com0

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The first performance benchmark of NVIDIA’s upcoming GeForce RTX 2070 graphics card has been leaked. The results come from TUM APISAK and were obtained using a custom model from ZOTAC which features slightly higher clock speeds than the reference variant.

NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2070 3DMark Timespy Benchmark Leaks Out – Slightly Faster Than GTX 1080 Custom Models

The benchmark results posted by the source aren’t very clear since it only displays the overall score and not the individual graphics score. The system was configured with a Core i7-8700K and ZOTAC GeForce RTX 2070 graphics card with a reported clock speed of 1950 MHz (Boost clocks). The score was 8151 points for the entire system and as I mentioned, there are no individual scores provided since the benchmark is hidden.

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The interesting part is that the GeForce GTX 1080 with the same CPU scores around 7500 points in 3DMark Timespy. The Core i7-8700K used here is clocked at 3.70 GHz which is the base clock of the CPU so it wasn’t overclocked and not affecting in a higher overall benchmark score. The GeForce RTX 2070 used is supposed to be a factory overclocked model so the performance can be expected to be slightly better on the new card compared to the Pascal-based GeForce GTX 1080.

NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2070 (Turing TU106 GPU) Graphics Card Specifications

The NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2070 features the TU106 GPU (TU106-400-A1) core which comprises of 2304 CUDA cores. NVIDIA’s 12nm FinFET architecture allows higher core count while retaining faster clock speeds which we have already seen on Pascal cards. The chip houses 10.6 Billion transistors which are a nice jump compared to the 7.2 Billion transistors on the Pascal GP104 GPU.

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The actual clock speeds are maintained at 1410 MHz base and 1620 MHz (Up to 1710 MHz OC). The chip features 8 GB of GDDR6 (next-gen) memory featured across a 256-bit bus and clocked at 14 GB/s. This leads to a total bandwidth of 448 GB/s.

The NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2080 features just 175W TDP. Coupled with a very smooth power delivery system to avoid leakage, the chip is one of the most efficient GPU architecture ever designed for gamers. The display outputs for the card include 3 Display Port 1.4 (4K @ 120 Hz), 1 HDMI 2.0b (4K @ 60 Hz) and USB Type-C connector for the Virtual link which means that it is capable to support all next-gen displays with new standards. Power is fed through an 8 and 6 pin power connectors.

NVIDIA GeForce RTX 20 Series Graphics Cards Official Specifications

Graphics Card Name NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2070 NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2080 NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2080 Ti
GPU Architecture Turing GPU (TU106) Turing GPU (TU104) Turing GPU (TU102)
Process 12nm NFF 12nm NFF 12nm NFF
Die Size 445mm2 545mm2 754mm2
Transistors 10.6 Billion 13.6 Billion 18.6 Billion
CUDA Cores 2304 Cores 2944 Cores 4352 Cores
TMUs/ROPs 144/64 192/64 288/96
GigaRays 6 Giga Rays/s 8 Giga Rays/s 10 Giga Rays/s
Cache 4 MB L2 Cache 4 MB L2 Cache 6 MB L2 Cache
Base Clock 1410 MHz 1515 MHz 1350 MHz
Boost Clock 1620 MHz
1710 MHz OC
1710 MHz
1800 MHz OC
1545 MHz
1635 MHz OC
Compute 7.5 TFLOPs 10.1 TFLOPs 13.4 TFLOPs
Memory 8 GB GDDR6 8 GB GDDR6 11 GB GDDR6
Memory Speed 14.00 Gbps 14.00 Gbps 14.00 Gbps
Memory Interface 256-bit 256-bit 352-bit
Memory Bandwidth 448 GB/s 448 GB/s 616 GB/s
Power Connectors 8 Pin 8+8 Pin 8+8 Pin
TDP 185W (Founders)
175W (Reference)
225W (Founders)
215W (Reference)
260W (Founders)
250W (Reference)
Starting Price $499 US $699 US $999 US
Price (Founders Edition) $599 US $799 US $1,199 US
Launch September 2018 September 2018 September 2018

The interesting thing to note from these specifications is that the GeForce RTX 2070 has a lower core count and slightly lower clocks than the GeForce GTX 1080. It comes with around the same TDP and power numbers but the main advantage aside from the performance advances from the Turing GPU architecture would be that the RTX 2070 would be the most affordable ray tracing graphics card, for the time being, starting at $499 US. I have heard that the RTX 2070 is going to be in good supply with several custom variants available at launch, next week. The reason is due to the Turing TU106 dies being much easier to produce compared to the flagship TU104 and TU102 GPUs.

Following are some of the custom models that will be available at launch from ASUS, MSI, and Gigabyte.

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